Asug Webcast Series

Is life better in the cloud? How can you make sure your cloud experience isn’t ineffective, stupid, or cruel to your managers and employees? What is the full business impact of bad self-service systems—and how can you avoid this at all costs? During this free webcast on Nov. 28, we will dive into

Speakers

Steven T. Hunt
Human Capital Management Research

Start

November 28, 2018

End

December 31, 2018

Address

Online Event   View map

Is life better in the cloud? How can you make sure your cloud experience isn’t ineffective, stupid, or cruel to your managers and employees? What is the full business impact of bad self-service systems—and how can you avoid this at all costs?

During this free webcast on Nov. 28, we will dive into the answers to these questions and more about life in the cloud with Dr. Steve Hunt, SPHR, Human Capital Management Research at SAP SuccessFactors.

Abstract:

To be truly effective, self-service solutions must be designed so managers and employees find them simple to use. However, many of these solutions are neither easy to access nor easy to use. And unfortunately, this is particularly common when companies are using outdated, non-mobile on-premise technology solutions.

 

In this webcast, we will explore how forcing employees to use bad self-service solutions is:

  1. Ineffective. The value of self-service depends on employees voluntarily entering information or taking actions to perform related tasks. When these systems are poorly designed, managers and employees will do everything possible to minimize time spent in the solution. This includes purposefully leaving out or changing information to make the process faster. For example, a manager might reclassify an employee turnover reason from involuntary to voluntary to avoid going through additional steps that would be forced upon him if he provided the real reason why an employee left the company.
  2. Stupid. The hourly rate of managers and line employees is often much higher than the hourly rate of HR administrative staff. However, companies often use self-service systems that require highly paid managers—and employees spend hours learning how to complete unfamiliar administrative tasks instead of having these tasks completed by an experienced administrative employee who could accomplish them in minutes. Managers and employees are not paid to be HR administrators, but many companies force them to spend time doing administrative tasks.
  3. Cruel. Horrific user interfaces are often attached to self-service processes that managers or employees must complete to get approval for something they need to do their work (e.g. access a new computer, hire a new staff member, adjust an employee’s pay). Forcing managers and employees to figure out these processes can create considerable stress and anxiety.

These three problems are a result of managers and employees being forced to use poorly designed self-service solutions. This webcast will help illustrate how much bad self-service systems damage employee workforce performance, morale and well-being.